Making the Most of Opportunities

As many of you may know, I have moved away from Denver. This is my last official blog post as an AIA Colorado Emerging Professional. Three months ago, I was presented with an opportunity to move to DC with my firm. It was one of those instances where the stars couldn’t have aligned better had I tried to plan it myself. If you know me, then you know I do try to plan it myself. In letting opportunity guide my path and watching this unfold, I have now identified key lessons for those of you that might be making a big transition yourself.

  • Opportunity may come knocking but that still doesn’t mean you sit back and relax. As a part of the move I had to research what salaries were in DC, what the cost of living increase is and if it was even going to be possible to maintain the lifestyle I had come to love in Denver. As they say, where there is a will there is a way. You need to put in the leg work, ask the questions and take action. You are your own best advocate. My move happened rather quickly, but it was because I had prepared along the way and knew what I was hoping to get out of the opportunity.
  • Once you move, life can be a bit daunting. You don’t have your regular friends, you may or may not move to be closer to family. In my case, it is the exact same distance as before (12 hours) but in the opposite direction. Social media is a beautiful thing and when used for a move, can open doors you didn’t know existed. Upon the announcement of my move, I reached out to junior high friends, high school friends, undergrad friends, grad school friends, conference friends and professional friends. Once again, this proved to me that networking and maintaining relationships is one of the most important things you can do. In many cases, I haven’t talked to these people in years. But it is amazing how meeting up with an old undergraduate architectural school friend in an unknown place can make it feel a little more comfortable.
    • TIP: When you hear from someone or are connected to someone else and say “let’s get together”, follow through! It will make your new place feel a little more like home.
  • For me, being involved and having a community is what drives me. I knew that in moving, I would have the opportunity to start over on my commitments, broaden my horizons and embrace new experiences. I also knew it meant leaving what was comfortable. So I brainstormed what was comfortable and found a group of University of Illinois Alumni called the DC Illini. They happened to have a volunteer opportunity at the DC Central Kitchen, a community kitchen engaged in food recycling and meal distribution programs. I wasn’t sure if I would meet anyone, if these alumni would be my age or what, but I figured this was a great way to get involved in the DC community and become a little more comfortable with being uncomfortable. It was only a 3-hour commitment. It was an amazing experience for a really amazing organization. And I met a few women who had graduated around the time I did who happen to work down the street.IMG_0216
  • Just say yes! My current roommates, who happen to be my Denver roommate’s parents, were having a dinner party on Monday evening. They invited me because the crowd was going to be fellow coworkers who were around my age. I went and made some connections with people doing different things than me. What’s funny is they all come from the volunteer and non-profit world. (Side note: They were throwing around acronyms and I gained a little insight into what it must feel like for non-architects to be around a group of architects.) I met a woman who is using design strategy to find solutions to poverty and marginalization in international communities. She was curious about my work as a trained designer and how that could potentially influence the work that they do.

Moving across the country, moving to a new company or going back to school are big changes for anyone. I have had a few opportunities to start new chapters in my life and it is through each start that I get a little more comfortable with the unknowns of new places and new people. But the key is to really build on the connections you have from previous chapters. Keeping all options on the table gives you the chance to create the new life you want to live.

With that, I close a Denver chapter and will hold dear the relationships and networks I built in Colorado. I already miss the architectural community and the EPs that I worked day in and day out to advance the architectural profession.

Thanks for the opportunity to guide this blog and become a leader among a group of such great leaders.

Best, Korey

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